Mr. Robinhood. “What are the near and far legs in a buyout contract?” Access on August 14, 2020. In the case of an overnight loan, the agreed term of the loan is one day. However, each party can extend the duration and, from time to time, the agreement has no expiry date. Beginning in late 2008, the Fed and other regulators adopted new rules to address these and other concerns. One consequence of these rules was to increase pressure on banks to maintain their safest assets, such as Treasuries. They are encouraged not to borrow them through boarding agreements. According to Bloomberg, the impact of the regulation was significant: at the end of 2008, the estimated value of the world securities borrowed was nearly $4 trillion. But since then, that number has been close to $2 trillion. In addition, the Fed has increasingly entered into pension (or self-repurchase) agreements to compensate for temporary fluctuations in bank reserves. In a reverse, a party buys securities and agrees to resell them later, often the next day, for a positive return. Most deposits are overnight, although they may be longer.

The value of the security is generally higher than the purchase price of the securities. The buyer agrees not to sell the security unless the seller comes from his late part of the agreement. On the agreed date, the seller must repurchase the securities, including the agreed interest rate or pension rate. Under a pension contract, the Federal Reserve (Fed) buys U.S. Treasury bonds, U.S. agency securities or mortgage-backed securities from a primary trader who agrees to buy them back within one to seven days; an inverted deposit is the opposite. This is how the Fed describes these transactions from the perspective of the counterparty and not from its own point of view. Since a repurchase agreement is a method of selling/buying back loans, the seller acts as a borrower and the buyer as a lender. The guarantee refers to securities sold, which are usually from the government. Pension loans provide rapid liquidity. Like many other corners of finance, retirement operations contain terminology that is not common elsewhere. One of the most common terms in repo space is “leg.” There are different types of legs: for example, the part of the retirement activity that originally sells security is sometimes called “starting leg,” while the subsequent buyback is the “close leg.” These terms are sometimes replaced by “Near Leg” or “Far Leg.” Near a repo transaction, security is sold.

The main difference between a term and an open pension is between the sale and repurchase of the securities. Deposits with a specified maturity date (usually the next day or the following week) are long-term repurchase contracts. A trader sells securities to a counterparty with the agreement that he will buy them back at a higher price at a given time. In this agreement, the counterparty receives the use of the securities for the duration of the transaction and receives interest that is indicated as the difference between the initial selling price and the purchase price. The interest rate is set and interest is paid at maturity by the trader. A repo term is used to invest cash or financial investments when the parties know how long it will take them. In some cases, the underlying security may lose its market value during the life of the repurchase agreement.

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